3 minute read // 10 - 03 - 2022

Top 25 most promising business of 2021

Dylan (24) and Robin (28) Laseur develop websites, apps and software with Flatline Agency. They do this so well, that their agency has grown from a basement to 16 people within two years. What they do: Websites, apps and software. Flatline Agency had a classic start: the entrepreneur’s frustration with an existing market, which desperately

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Dylan Laseur and Robin Laseur standing in between a gate in the sun

Dylan (24) and Robin (28) Laseur develop websites, apps and software with Flatline Agency. They do this so well, that their agency has grown from a basement to 16 people within two years. What they do: Websites, apps and software.

Flatline Agency had a classic start: the entrepreneur’s frustration with an existing market, which desperately needs shaking up. ‘Actually, we started this by accident,’ explains Dylan Laseur. ‘We were working on a platform to put brokers out of business. Because of our studies and internships we were so busy that we decided to partly outsource the construction. When we asked for quotes from development parties, they only came after weeks of waiting and they were between 100K and 200K, without us initially being given access to the hourly calculation. After some urging we got it, and we saw that the hours were done times 4 to 5.

Name Change


The following day, the Laseur brothers abandoned their platform and immediately put a website online: Orange & Lemons. There weren’t even any texts or photos on it yet, but the story went around so quickly that we also built websites for third parties and within 3 days we had our first client.’ Now, two years later, Flatline Agency – the name was recently changed to avoid confusion with competitors and to emphasize its international ambition – serves numerous clients with custom development solutions such as websites, apps, software and even blockchain applications with 16 people. Other entrepreneurs and managers of large corporates often come to us with a digital issue that they themselves or their team do not have an answer to. We then become an extension of their regular digital partner.’

Obscure Market


‘One of our biggest drivers is ‘making the obscure development market transparent and actively improving it’. We always make an open hourly calculation, we give an estimate or quote within 48 hours and we provide customers, large and small, with services from A to Z.’ The Laseurs distinguish themselves with a young, eager and fast-paced culture within their company, where there are not only young dogs running around, but also experienced developers who transferred from large corporates. When we first started, there were corporates who looked at our way of working with some suspicion and were even a bit scared. But now we sometimes even have to turn them away because we are full.’ From a basement, his desk moved into an office, where it popped out within 5 months. ‘Where we will be in 5 years, I really don’t dare say given that our growth forecast for this year has turned out to be totally unreasonable. What I do know for sure is that we will be opening one or more offices in other countries within the next two years. The international demand there is getting bigger and bigger, so we expect that a local presence is not a bad idea either. We are also building several brands under which we will provide new services.

‘Our Generation’


Laseur experiences his youthful age as an entrepreneur primarily as something positive. ‘People trust in an industry like this that young guys might be able and know better than the known parties. They like to spar with us about ideas, to see ‘whether our generation would also find it interesting. Laseur still has tips for starting young entrepreneurs, which he has learned from his own experience: ‘Find the right partner. As stupid as it sounds, don’t simply try to get involved with a friend you’ve known for a long time or simply develop a good idea without the right powers. And: go all-in or go all-out. We too had prices in the beginning that were not feasible with a normal salary. Therefore we worked 80-100 hours per week to still make a profit and build a portfolio. This would never have gotten off the ground if we didn’t have the courage to quit our jobs, put our friendships on ‘pause’ for a while and just started trying.’

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